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Industry insights

CHAPTER 5

Chief Enterprise Architect & Strategist at Nissan

 

Is there an IT/OT divide, and is that a problem?

 

We do differentiate, there is a bit of a divide, yes.

 

I think in the long run it has to come together in a homogeneous way, because right now, because there is a divide, there's a different way of doing things between the two groups. So the information sharing isn't as seamless as it could be, or sometimes it's even nonexistent. 

 

I think it creates that information gap, so if you want to make end-to-end decisions based on what's happening on the industrial side and how do you connect the dots with the warranty, and up-sell, after market - all that information, sharing can become difficult unless it comes together.

 

What can a business do?

 

Industry 4.0 addresses that, I have been trying to pursue it from that angle. Industry 4.0 is all about OT industrialization and technology in industry, and really sharing the information, making it available, making smart decisions, not just about what happened yesterday, but what could happen tomorrow - predictive maintenance, things like that. 

 

Is this all just hype?

 

Especially with machine learning and big data, it's getting more and more obvious that information sharing from one side to the other can be beneficial in making more money at the end of the day really, because now you are making smarter decisions based on what happened and what could happen as opposed to just making decisions in silo from just one to the other.

CHAPTER 6

Research piece - Nick Parfitt

 
 
 
 
 
 

BLAH

 

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy. Please indicate the compliance of your data center with the given feature. Compliance may be considered partial if a plan for implemented is underway or if not applied universally throughout the facility. The feature may be considered not applicable if equivalent alternative measures have been selected. Please indicate the compliance of your data center with the given feature. Compliance may be considered partial if a plan for implemented is underway or if not applied universally throughout the facility.

 

The feature may be considered not applicable if equivalent alternative measures have been selected.I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy. Please indicate the compliance of your data center with the given feature. Compliance may be considered partial if a plan for implemented is underway or if not applied universally throughout the facility. The feature may be considered not applicable if equivalent alternative measures have been selected. Please indicate the compliance of your data center with the given feature.

'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy. Please indicate the compliance of your data center with the given feature. Compliance may be considered partial if a plan for implemented is underway or if not applied universally throughout the facility. The feature may be considered not applicable if equivalent alternative measures have been selected. Please indicate the compliance of your data center with the given feature.

Introduction

In the late 18th and early 19th century change gripped Europe. As society embraced water and steam power, new manufacturing methods sprang up and the factory system was born. In the fires of this first great industrial revolution, the world was forever altered. By the 19th century it was time for the next revolution, and all it took was a spark. Electricity opened up a whole new universe of possibilities for civilizations eager to capitalize on the greatest period of invention in their history, again fundamentally changing factories in ways before not imagined.


The third industrial revolution came with the adoption of the computer. As the 20th century began to wane, factories turned to machines to automate production processes on the factory floor, hugely impacting how they operate.


And yet, despite these monumental changes, that factory floor has yet to see its most profound evolution - when the digitization potential of the factory is truly unlocked, and every aspect of the value chain is optimized to take advantage of the benefits of the digital world.

 

But this fourth industrial revolution, like those before it, requires the right technology to embrace, and harness, what it has to offer. Mission critical IT must find itself on the factory floor, right in the heart of the action. It is at this industrial edge where the seeds of the next transformation are to be found.

The IT meets OT story

 
 
PRODUCED IN
ASSOCIATION WITH
CHAPTER 1

What is Industry 4.0 & the Smart Factory

Two worlds are coming together, and it is up to businesses to ensure that this meeting of minds is a harmonious partnership, not an avoidable collision. Predicted for some time, people from the spheres of Information Technology (IT) and Operational Technology (OT) are finally coming tor due to the Industrial Internet.

CHAPTER 3

The data journey

CHAPTER 2

A factory produces goods, a smart factory produces both goods and data. To ensure that that data is used effectively, and that its value is fully extracted, requires the data to go on a journey.

The data’s life begins on the factory floor, with Industrial Internet of Things sensors capturing data from machines involved with the production process. Real time data from distributed control systems, manufacturing execution systems (MES), asset management systems (AMS), etc. are brought together to build digital twins of the machines on the factory floor.

Having a digital twin of factory machines and the supply chain itself can allow companies to have a complete digital footprint of their products from conception to delivery. This long-craved ability to fully understand one’s value chain allows for rapid process changes to be tested virtually, giving companies new insights into how to improve their products, increase their yields and better serve their customers.

But that all requires collecting data.

Inside this information critical warnings can be hidden - sometimes serious issues can be spotted that may require the production line to be stopped to avoid failures. With this in mind, the data is often stored at the edge, near the factory and the machines themselves. With latency minimized, errors can be avoided before humans are even aware of them, allowing for predictive maintenance.

But some companies can be reticent about putting this data - raw and unstructured before it is processed - on the cloud. Essentially a recipe to a company’s production methods, they prefer instead to keep it close. Perishable data is captured and quickly processed near the source, ensuring heightened security and that vast quantities of data are not needlessly uploaded to the cloud.

Once the perishable data is filtered out, some data can still be sent to the cloud, and added to data coming from other factories and other aspects of the supply chain.

This data is then brought full circle. With the end-to-end digitization of processes across the entire value chain, the data can be used to improve the design and engineering phase, supply chain management, and the manufacturing phase itself.

The data
journey

CHAPTER 2
Image
Gallery
CHAPTER 3
The IT meets the
OT story
CHAPTER 4
Industry
Insights
CHAPTER 5
Research Title
Needed
CHAPTER 6
What is Industry 4.0 & the Smart Factory
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 4

Image gallery

Mission Critical IT on the factory floor

Exploring the industrial edge